The Process of Training Baby Elephants In A Huge And Harsh Environment Must Suffer To Grow Up

The Process of Training Baby Elephants in Harsh and Wide Environment

Elephants are one of the most intelligent animals in the world. They have a long lifespan and a complex social structure, making them fascinating creatures. When it comes to training baby elephants, it is a long and difficult process that requires patience, perseverance, and dedication.

In the wild, baby elephants learn from their mothers and the herd. They learn how to find food, how to interact with other elephants, and how to avoid danger. However, when baby elephants are taken away from their natural habitat and put into captivity, they lose this opportunity to learn and grow.

To train baby elephants in captivity, trainers use a technique called “phajaan” or “the crush.” This technique involves separating the baby elephant from its mother and confining it in a small space, often a wooden cage. The baby elephant is then beaten, poked, and prodded with sharp objects until it submits to the trainer’s commands.

This technique is cruel and inhumane, and it has been banned in many countries. However, there are still some places where it is used. Fortunately, there are other ways to train baby elephants that are more humane and effective.

One way to train baby elephants is through positive reinforcement. This involves rewarding the elephant for good behavior, rather than punishing it for bad behavior. Trainers use treats, praise, and other rewards to encourage the elephant to learn new behaviors.

Another way to train baby elephants is through social learning. This involves placing the baby elephant with older elephants who can teach it how to behave. This method allows the baby elephant to learn in a natural and safe environment, just as it would in the wild.

In conclusion, training baby elephants is a long and difficult process that requires patience, perseverance, and dedication. While the traditional method of “phajaan” may still be used in some places, there are more humane and effective ways to train baby elephants. By using positive reinforcement and social learning, we can help baby elephants grow and thrive in captivity.

Despite the fact that some countries have banned the traditional method of phajaan, there are still some places where this method is being used. This is mainly because the process of training baby elephants through positive reinforcement and social learning is more time-consuming and requires more effort from the trainers. However, the process is worth it in the long run as it results in a healthier and happier elephant that is more responsive to its trainers.

Positive reinforcement involves rewarding the baby elephant for good behavior, such as obeying commands, rather than punishing it for bad behavior. This method helps to build trust between the trainer and the elephant and encourages the elephant to learn new behaviors.

Social learning, on the other hand, involves placing the baby elephant with older elephants who can teach it how to behave. The baby elephant learns by observing the behavior of the older elephants and mimicking what they do. This method allows the baby elephant to learn in a natural and safe environment, just as it would in the wild.

Training baby elephants through positive reinforcement and social learning not only results in a healthier and happier elephant, but it also benefits the trainers. Trainers who use these methods have a better relationship with the elephants, which makes it easier for them to train the elephants and keep them healthy.

In conclusion, the process of training baby elephants is a long and challenging one that requires patience, perseverance, and dedication. While the traditional method of phajaan may still be used in some places, it is a cruel and inhumane method that has been banned in many countries. Positive reinforcement and social learning are more humane and effective methods of training baby elephants that result in healthier and happier elephants that are more responsive to their trainers.

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